Marine Fisheries Policy Series No.14; India Non-Detriment Finding (NDF) for thresher sharks, Alopias spp., in the Indian Ocean

Kizhakudan, Shoba Joe and Zacharia, P U and Thomas, Sujitha and Najmudeen, T M and Akhilesh, K V and Muktha, M and Dash, Swatipriyanka Sen and Rahangdale, Shikha and Nair, Rekha J and Purushottama, G B and Mahesh, V and Ambarish, Gop P and Manojkumar, P P and Remya, L and Wilson, Livi (2019) Marine Fisheries Policy Series No.14; India Non-Detriment Finding (NDF) for thresher sharks, Alopias spp., in the Indian Ocean. CMFRI; Kochi, pp. 1-60.

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    Abstract

    Four species of sharks and all species of devil rays were included in Appendix II of CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna) at the 17th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP17, Johannesburg) in 2016. Following CITES norms, India, like all other signatory countries, is required to carry out Non-Detriment findings studies to ensure that trade in these listed species does not threaten their survival. ICAR-Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute, which is the recognized Scientific Authority of CITES in India for marine resources, has already published NDFs for three species of hammerhead sharks, the oceanic white tip shark and two species of Manta rays which were included in Appendix II of CITES in 2013. The current NDF is on thresher sharks Alopias pelagicus and Alopias superciliosus, which are harvested from the Indian EEZ and which were listed in Appendix II of CITES in 2016. Thresher sharks are highly migratory pelagic predators, with a circumglobal distribution in tropical and temperate oceanic and coastal seas. Of the three species listed, two are known to occur in Indian waters while the occurrence of the third species, Alopias vulpinus, is doubtful. Thresher sharks are often seen in the landings along the Indian coast, with a higher incidence along the southern and the north-western coasts. Although CITES regulations are legally binding on the signatory parties, it does not constitute or replace national laws, and the countries are advised to implement CITES regulations within the ambit of their own legislations. Considering the importance of thresher sharks in India’s shark landings, and the fact that they have been categorized as Vulnerable in the IUCN Red List, this document should pave the way for effecting suitable fishery monitoring and management measures.

    Item Type: Book
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Marine Fisheries Policy Series; Alopias spp.; thresher shark
    Subjects: Demersal Fisheries > Shark fisheries
    CMFRI Publications > CMFRI Policy Series
    Marine Fisheries > Policy
    Marine Fisheries > Fisheries Management
    Aquaculture > Fisheries Management

    Marine Fisheries
    Divisions: CMFRI-Kochi > Marine Capture > Demersal Fisheries
    Subject Area > CMFRI > CMFRI-Kochi > Marine Capture > Demersal Fisheries
    CMFRI-Kochi > Marine Capture > Demersal Fisheries
    Subject Area > CMFRI-Kochi > Marine Capture > Demersal Fisheries
    Depositing User: Arun Surendran
    Date Deposited: 22 Nov 2019 10:16
    Last Modified: 16 Dec 2019 09:09
    URI: http://eprints.cmfri.org.in/id/eprint/13948

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