Role of CMFRI in seaweed mariculture in India and development of high-value compounds and biomass utilization for Atmanirbhar Swasth Bharat

Gopalakrishnan, A (2024) Role of CMFRI in seaweed mariculture in India and development of high-value compounds and biomass utilization for Atmanirbhar Swasth Bharat. In: ICAR Winter School on Harnessing Recent Advances in High-Value Compound Development and Seaweed Biomass Utilization for Human Well-being: Propelling Atmanirbhar Swastha Bharat and Empowering Farmers 15th February to 06th March 2024 Course Manual. ICAR- Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Kochi, pp. 1-8.

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    Abstract

    Seaweeds are exploited commercially for their cell wall polysaccharides such as agar, algin, carrageenan etc and for manure, fodder and bioactive metabolites. Seaweed also represents an excellent source of fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. They are marine macrophytic thallophytes consisting of taxonomically distinguished groups of green (Chlorophyta), brown (Phaeophyta) and red (Rhodophyta) seaweeds. These seaweed resources grow best in the tidal and inter-tidal waters along our peninsular coastline and the Andaman-Nicobar and Lakshadweep Archipelagos. India is bestowed with more than 0.26 million tonnes wet harvestable biomass of seaweeds belonging to 700 species Of these, nearly 60 species are economically important for their polysaccharides and secondary metabolites. Approximately 20,000 tonnes (wet weight) of these resources are harvested annually from the wild in India. The commercial exploitation of seaweeds in India has started in 1966. Seaweeds such as Gelidiella, Gracilaria and Sargassum were being exported from India until 1975. But, the Government of India, considering the need of local agar and algin industries, later banned the export. However, the seaweed industries in India do not produce as yet the required quantities of sodium alginate and agar. As a result, India imports agar and algin every year, spending a considerable amount of foreign exchange. At present, seaweeds from Gujarat coast and many localities in Tamil Nadu are harvested by small- and large-scale industries. The ICAR-Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI) has been working on seaweed mariculture and seaweed utilization in India since 1972. Mandapam Regional Station of CMFRI has developed the technology for commercial scale cultivation of Gracilaria edulis, an agar yielding red algae, using raft, coir-rope nets/spore method. This Station has also developed a cottage industry method for the manufacture of agar from Gracilaria spp. and alginic acid from Sargassum spp. during 1980s and demonstrated the agar and align production to many farmers and entrepreneurs. These demonstrations have paved ways for development of many small-scale agar industries at Madurai, Tamil Nadu.

    Item Type: Book Section
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Seaweed; Mariculture
    Subjects: Biochemistry > Bioactive compounds
    Biochemistry
    Algae > Seaweed
    Aquaculture > Mariculture
    Divisions: CMFRI-Kochi > Marine Biotechnology, Fish Nutrition and Health Division
    Subject Area > CMFRI > CMFRI-Kochi > Marine Biotechnology, Fish Nutrition and Health Division
    CMFRI-Kochi > Marine Biotechnology, Fish Nutrition and Health Division
    Subject Area > CMFRI-Kochi > Marine Biotechnology, Fish Nutrition and Health Division
    Depositing User: Arun Surendran
    Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2024 06:17
    Last Modified: 21 Mar 2024 06:17
    URI: http://eprints.cmfri.org.in/id/eprint/18186

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