Jellyfishes-Diversity, Biology-Importance in Conservation In: ICAR Sponsored Winter School on Recent Advances in Fishery Biology Techniques for Biodiversity Evaluation and Conservation, 1-21 December 2018, Kochi.

Saravanan, Raju (2018) Jellyfishes-Diversity, Biology-Importance in Conservation In: ICAR Sponsored Winter School on Recent Advances in Fishery Biology Techniques for Biodiversity Evaluation and Conservation, 1-21 December 2018, Kochi. [Teaching Resource]

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27-Winter School on Recent Advances in Fishery Biology Techniques for Biodiversity Evaluation and Conservation_2018_Saravanan R.pdf

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    Abstract

    Jellyfish is a common word used for any gelatinous animal in marine waters. These include a wide variety of stinging and non-stinging jellyfishes. Jellyfishes are the oldest animal on planet earth from Pre-Cambrian period, and passed through 500 million years of natural selection. The term jellyfish generally refers to gelatinous zooplankton including medusae of the phylum Cnidaria(scyophomedusae, hydromedusae, cubomedusae and siphonohores) and planktonic members of the phylum Ctenophora, Salps and Pyrosomes etc. The true jelly fish are coming under the three Cinidarian classes viz., Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa and Cubozoa and seasonally swarm in the coastal waters. Among the three classes; representatives of Scyphozoan and Cubozoan are ranging in size from 2mm to 2 m bell diameter, however most of the hydrozoan jellyfishes are smaller than 2mm in bell diameter and belong to the mesoplankton. The biodiversity of the pelagic scyphozoan jellyfishes and Cubozoan jellyfishes is largely ignored in India other than a few works in this line. The first work on scyphozoan medusae was published way back in 1930, in which the scyphomedusae of Madras has been described with illustrations (Menon, 1930). Subsequent to this publication the above author has brought out scyphomedusae of Kurusadai Island (Menon, 1936). These are the two classic works which describe about the taxonomic features and distribution of scyphomedusae along the south east coast of India. Since then there is a long gap in the study of scyphomedusae in India. The scyphomedusae available in India was listed as 34 by Chakrapany (1984). The Medusae of the Travancore waters was studied by Nair (1951) and assessed the impact on fisheries.

    Item Type: Teaching Resource
    Subjects: Marine Biology
    Invertebrata
    Divisions: CMFRI-Mandapam
    Depositing User: Arun Surendran
    Date Deposited: 05 Jan 2019 05:33
    Last Modified: 15 Feb 2019 05:29
    URI: http://eprints.cmfri.org.in/id/eprint/13329

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